Combining Traditional Cancer Treatment With Complementary Therapy Could Improve Survival

Receiving the news that you have cancer can come about as a big shock, leaving you asking hundreds of questions. It is because of this that it is essential that patients have access to the best advice, founded on accurate information so that they can make informed decisions about their treatments. If you research online, you will find a myriad of articles relating to more easily accessible and less daunting forms of treatment when compared to the standard medical approach.

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Not Much Sun Exposure Is Needed To Get Your Vitamin D

UV rays in sunlight are the main culprit of skin cancer, but sunshine is needed in producing essential vitamin D. One of the dangers of having low vitamin D is rickets, and in recent years it has increased slightly. This suggests that some people are not spending enough time outside in the sun. Interestingly, skin cancer rates are rising, for example, almost 16,000 people are diagnosed with melanoma every year in the UK. Depending on your skin type, the amount of sunlight exposure you need to get enough vitamin D varies. However, the balance of how long people need to spend in the sun to generate enough vitamin D while minimizing their skin cancer risk remains unclear.

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Best of ASCO 2018 Annual Meeting

Our 32nd Best of ASCO Annual Meeting is happening this October. This Annual Convention is to be held across Wednesday, the 10th of October until Friday, the 12th of October (10/10/18 – 10/12/18). This year’s event will be held at EDSA Shangri-La Hotel, Mandaluyong City. You can download the registration form here For any further…

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What To Say To A Loved One Who Has Cancer

It is difficult to understand what a cancer patient is going through. Knowing the right things to say to a patient about their illness can be tricky, especially given that many people haven’t had the experience of having cancer themselves.“When someone you love is dealing with something like cancer, there’s a feeling of helplessness,” says Katelyn MacDougall, LICSW, who is a social worker at Dana-Farber’s Young Adult Program. “We try to say things we think will make it feel better, but nothing we say is going to make cancer better; patients just want to know that people are supporting them.”

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